WELDINGSpecialized Welding

Welding - Samarth Engineering Works


Aluminium welding

Aluminium welding

Samarth Engineering Works offers high quality and specialized aluminium welding such as welding for any type of aluminum products or elements. We do repair parts efficiently and eliminate downtime with excellent finish, with minimal clean-up.
Arc Welding

Arc Welding

Arc welding is a type of welding that uses a welding power supply to create an electric arc between an electrode and the base material to melt the metals at the welding point. We do arc welding commercially in shipbuilding and fabrication of steel structures and vehicles.
Gas Welding

Gas Welding

Get the right welding gas or gas mixture to optimise your welding applications. Here at Samarth Engineering worlks we do complete oxy-acetylene welding kit that handles a broad range of cutting, welding and heating applications! we do workwith complete set of equipments as oxygen and acetylene hoses, welding nozzle, cutting tip, cutting attachment, check valves, tip cleaners and striker to deliver quality gas welding.
Argon (TIG) Welding

Argon (TIG) Welding

TIG stands for Tungsten Inert Gas welding. Also called GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and Heliarc which was Linde's trade name for the TIG process when it was introduced many years ago.TIG are argon welding as the processes uses argon for shielding as it is a innert gas. The arc is started with a tungsten electrode shielded by inert gas and filler rod is fed into the weld puddle separately. A slower process than MIG, it produces a more precise weld and can be used at lower amperages for thinner metal and can be used on exotic metals.
Spray Welding

Spray Welding

Spray welding, also known as metalizing, is a commonly used generic term used to describe multipleprocesses, all of which fall into an industry known as thermal spray. Thermalnspray includes the following processes: HVOF; Plasma; Detonation Gun; Flame and Arc Spray; and different forms of each of them. Thermal spray is a means ofusing material in a powder or wire form, energizing it, and then introducing acompressed gas to propel it on to a work piece or part to form a coating. we provide services for both Hot Spray & Cold Spray.
X-Ray Welding

X-Ray Welding

X-ray beams have been shown to have potential as welding sources for classes of materials which cannot be welded conventionally.Many advances in welding technology have resulted from the introduction of new sources of the thermal energy required for localised melting. These advances include the introduction of modern techniques such as gas tungsten arc, gas-metal arc, submerged-arc, electron beam, and laser beam welding processes. However, whilst these processes were able to improve stability, reproducibility, and accuracy of welding, they share a common limitation - the energy does not fully penetrate the material to be welded, resulting in the formation of a melt pool on the surface of the material. To achieve welds which penetrate the full depth of the material, it is necessary to either specially design and prepare the geometry of the joint or cause vaporization of the material to such a degree that a "keyhole" is formed, allowing the heat to penetrate the joint. This is not a significant disadvantage in many types of material, as good joint strengths can be achieved, however for certain material classes such as ceramics or metal ceramic composites, such processing can significantly limit joint strength. They have great potential for use in the aerospace industry, provided a joining process that maintains the strength of the material can be found. Until recently, sources of x-rays of sufficient intensity to cause enough volumetric heating for welding were not available.
MIG (CO2) Welding

MIG (CO2) Welding

MIG stands for Metal Inert Gas welding, many times called Wire-feed. Also referred as GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding). The "Metal" refers to the wire which is what is used to start the arc. It is shielded by inert gas and the feeding wire also acts as the filler rod. A semi-automatic process, it is fairly easy to learn and use. As we strive to meet the demands of increasingly fast-paced industries, our focus on productivity can often overshadow some of the basic techniques necessary for our welding application. Unknowingly, we may come to rely too much on technology to solve our problems and keep products moving out the door.